Category Archives: Private cloud

Today’s Nugget: Oracle OpenWorld 2015 … Or Not

Alas, my submission for this year’s Oracle OpenWorld was turned down by Oracle a little while ago.

Maybe I shouldn’t have installed this browser extension?

Tee-hee 🙂

I’m nothing if not persistent(ly annoying) – so I submitted a similar abstract to the 2016 RMOUG Training Days.

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Complete Cloud Confusion

Version X5 of Oracle’s engineered systems – presumably Exadata, Exalogic and Exalytics with a garnishing of a ZFS/ZDLR appliance or two – will be finally unveiled tomorrow.

No doubt more of everything will be involved (Flash, memory, CPU, cupcakes), making DBA geeks drool and widening the performance chasm between Oracle’s engineered systems and a lot of the “industry trends” we read so much about right now. Hopefully, those who have been on the waiting list since they stopped shipping the X4s will feel it’s been worth the wait.  Enjoy your new gadgets!

As a technologist, it’s difficult not to be impressed with exponentially-improving kit, especially when it feels like the industry is collectively yearning for 1990s technology.

Imagine, if you will, my surprise, when I learned of another webcast a week later, followed by a serious PR push from Larry Ellison and Mark Hurd about THE CLOUD(TM).

Huh? Isn’t pushing a new class of engineered systems (lots of lovely CapEx … mmm-hmm!) and then pushing CLOUDCLOUDCLOUD (CapEx, be GONE!) a week later a juxtaposition?

And what about this quote:

” … on-premises software sales grew 6% in constant currency. I continue to expect this business to grow nicely while our cloud business continues to maintain hypergrowth … “

Really?

Oracle believes CIOs are going to maintain spending in “traditional” infrastructure AND invest big in THE CLOUD(TM) at the same time? Hmm.

And isn’t THE CLOUD(TM) fantastic and magical and revolutionary because organizations plan to eliminate spending on support groups and hardware and transfer their budgets to OpEx instead, saving tons of cash? (We’ll put the many and varied issues of doing this to one side for the moment).

Am I the only one confused by this?

That being said …

Unlike most THE CLOUD(TM) vendors, Oracle’s cloud offering includes Platform-as-a-Service, which provides the first “real” managed database service in THE CLOUD(TM) including Exadata and all the performance and security cost options you can buy for the Oracle database “on-site”.

Even as someone who isn’t exactly a strong advocate of THE CLOUD(TM), it’s difficult to dispute that this addresses some – though by no means all – of the problems associated with cloud computing.

Up until now, most providers have been offering more of an Infrastructure-as-a-Service solution, which is geared almost entirely towards cost savings. With PaaS, a viable argument can be made that functionality and performance can be as good, if not better, than internally managed systems.

I’ll admit that this all had my curiosity, but now has my attention.

Maybe Oracle is one of two companies (IBM, perhaps?) who can afford to invest the massive sums needed to cover both bases well enough, though it should be noted that Amazon STILL hasn’t made a profit on AWS yet. And how will they avoid their sales pitches becoming confusing muddles of uncertainty involving DOUBLE the salespeople (one set for engineered systems, one set for THE CLOUD(TM))?

I’ll be honest, this still doesn’t make sense to me – I just don’t get it.

I have no doubt Oracle will be pushing Exadata’s suitability for THE CLOUD(TM) tomorrow by introducing new elastic/scalable/on-demand features, but engineered systems and THE CLOUD(TM) seem so diametrically opposed that they’re all but mutually exclusive.

We’ll know soon enough, I guess!  The cloud is coming, whether we agrees with it or not!

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Public Cloud vs. Private Cloud vs. Engineered Systems?

I listened to an Oracle webinar on “The Value of Engineered Systems” yesterday. It didn’t really cover anything ground-breaking from my point of view, but it offered the following facts or thinking:

It should be noted that I’ve spent my career as a Oracle (relational) DBA of some description, so I’m sure there’s some degree of bias. However, I’m an advocate of Oracle databases because they’ve proven to be the best on the market.

  • There will be an estimated 50 billion Internet devices by 2020.
  • 90% of all data in the world has been created within the last 2 years.
  • An estimated 50x data growth is expected by 2020 thanks to the Internet of Things, Social Media, surveillance
  • An estimated 340 trillion IP addresses will be required by 2020 – I hope SOMEONE is using IPv6 by then!
  • IT departments need to grow by 4% per annum just to maintain existing systems, excluding any growth of business needs – yet companies continue to make cuts in infrastructure and avoid investing in R&D.
  • Storage accounts for 17% of IT budget.
  • Oracle do NOT expect customers to host their PRODUCTION systems in the PUBLIC Cloud – they see customers to host PRODUCTION in a PRIVATE Cloud (either hosted by the customer or via co-lo) ***
  • Instead, they expect SaaS for Development to be the big draw for the PUBLIC Cloud.
  • Engineered systems simplifies IT.
  • Oracle is awesome.
  • Exadata is awesome on steroids.

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