Tag Archives: Hadoop

Random Links

In case you have a spare minute or two on your lunch break today …  Continue reading

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Big Data Blame

I thought I’d share a very interesting article on Big Data and its massively underwhelming (so far) business impact.

Might the trade mag hype machine be close to admitting that Big Data is a far more complicated beast than they have been suggesting? Surely not…

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Hadoop Rolls Out Transparent Encryption

This could be a big deal for Hadoop and enterprise adoption. End-to-end encryption should be a big winner, especially with support groups, as it’s largely been pushed to the sidebar until now.

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Oracle Big Data Lite VM 4.0

Following OpenWorld, Oracle released version 4.0 of their Big Data Appliance Lite Virtual Machine for VirtualBox.

It includes OEL 6.4, RDBMS database 12.1.0.2 with Big Data SQL, Cloudera 5.1.2, NoSQL database 3.0.14 and GoldenGate 12c.

The “Getting Started” page now has all sorts of good documentation, white papers and hands-on labs you can try out.

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Oracle Big Data SQL Primer

What is Big Data SQL?
Oracle Big Data SQL runs on the Big Data Appliance and allows an Oracle database to run one SQL query to pull data from disparate sources such as Hadoop, NoSQL and relational databases.

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Cloudera Primer for Relational DBAs

Recently, Cloudera paid a visit to HQ and gave a presentation on their industry-standard implementation of Hadoop. I found it to be very insightful, especially given the paucity of details and proliferation of industry buzzwords that currently attaches itself to anything remotely related to “Big Data”.

I made some notes/observations during the presentation and did some follow-up reading afterwards. In case they’re useful, especially to those DBAs out there who might be expected to support Cloudera pretty soon, I typed up the notes and put them on here.

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Oracle’s “Nightmare”?

Over the last six weeks or so, I’ve been voraciously reading about Big Data, NoSQL, Hadoop and other emerging data management technologies which are clearly The Next Big Thing™ in IT. Personally, I find it fascinating to learn/think about how we will integrate different volumes and scales of data – both structured and unstructured, big and small – to give our organizations a clear, competitive edge in their industries.

As with all Next Big Things™, there are a lot of tremendous blogs and white papers written by some extremely smart and insightful people – and there are a lot of articles in “trade mags” which do nothing but fuel the runaway hype. Continue reading

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Public Cloud vs. Private Cloud vs. Engineered Systems?

I listened to an Oracle webinar on “The Value of Engineered Systems” yesterday. It didn’t really cover anything ground-breaking from my point of view, but it offered the following facts or thinking:

It should be noted that I’ve spent my career as a Oracle (relational) DBA of some description, so I’m sure there’s some degree of bias. However, I’m an advocate of Oracle databases because they’ve proven to be the best on the market.

  • There will be an estimated 50 billion Internet devices by 2020.
  • 90% of all data in the world has been created within the last 2 years.
  • An estimated 50x data growth is expected by 2020 thanks to the Internet of Things, Social Media, surveillance
  • An estimated 340 trillion IP addresses will be required by 2020 – I hope SOMEONE is using IPv6 by then!
  • IT departments need to grow by 4% per annum just to maintain existing systems, excluding any growth of business needs – yet companies continue to make cuts in infrastructure and avoid investing in R&D.
  • Storage accounts for 17% of IT budget.
  • Oracle do NOT expect customers to host their PRODUCTION systems in the PUBLIC Cloud – they see customers to host PRODUCTION in a PRIVATE Cloud (either hosted by the customer or via co-lo) ***
  • Instead, they expect SaaS for Development to be the big draw for the PUBLIC Cloud.
  • Engineered systems simplifies IT.
  • Oracle is awesome.
  • Exadata is awesome on steroids.

Continue reading

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Some Interesting Articles about “Big Data”

My interest in Big Data was piqued recently when an excellent Oracle consultant was able to get me to understand its purpose and value during our ExCite review.

Here are a collection of links that I’ve found while reading up about the technology. I hope some are of interest.

Putting Big Data in context.

The awesome ways in which Big Data is used today.

The 5 “V”s everyone should know about Big Data.

“Big Data is like stomach bacteria” – I’ll admit that I included this one because I thought this one quote was awesome!

Why your data is dirty.

How small businesses can scale the Big Data barrier.

Going forward, the companies that have the best data will win … until you can understand precisely what your customer wants, what they don’t want, how they want it and when they want it, you’ll be left to guess — and guessing is a very, very expensive business sport.”

Oracle’s view on Big Data – not as focused towards infrastructure spending as you might think!

“Too often, IT leaders look at the infrastructure needed for a Big Data analytics solution rather than the business requirement for the solution. They focus on the storage and compute capacity needed, or make decisions based on technology. This is usually driven by the need to contain ballooning infrastructure costs. Instead, IT leaders should focus on business outcomes of big data initiatives.”

Big Data requirements include a different … management of environments as compared to traditional deployments. This, in turn, requires changes in operational processes. Trying to add Big Data deployments into an existing environment will not help.

Big Data environments need to be structured separately and the operating processes to maintain them will also need to change. Failing to do so will only ensure a highly complex and non-sustainable architecture.”

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