Category Archives: NoSQL

DELETED_BECAUSE_YOU_DIDNT_PASSWORD_PROTECT_YOUR_MONGODB

It’s been a very busy summer for yours truly and the rest of the database world.  Some interesting nouvelles (I thought so, at least) in case you missed them:

 

GET RID OF ORACLE!
The UK Government has ordered its agencies to “get rid of Oracle“. While Oracle have been shooting themselves in the foot spectacularly of late with their bedside manner, I have personal experience of the last time that the UKG wanted to replace them.

It didn’t go well. At all.

Nor did it go cheaply, which is all that anyone is caring about, of course.

Despite the horror stories in the media about how difficult it is to deal with Oracle’s support, sales and auditing teams, it’s still the best database out there by a country mile.

 

Ask … Someone Other Than Tom
It’s no longer possible to Ask Tom. Mr. Kyte has decided to take a very well-deserved sabbatical and has handed over Ask Tom duties to … someone who isn’t called Tom.

What a crazy world we live in.

I’m not going to lie – I definitely was dazzled by his stardom on more than one occasion. At a NEOUG conference in Cleveland, I managed to get him to sign a copy of his book and one of the most memorable moments of my DBA career was when I asked him a “great question” on a webinar many years ago. It helped me win an important argument at work, so I will always be thankful to him for that 🙂

 

Don’t Believe The Hype
Talking of which, not even Gartner thinks Big Data is worthy of the hype now. Instead of moving to their “Slope of Enlightenment” or “Plateau of Productivity”, it fell off their Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies completely.

Oops.

 

NoSQL = NoPASSWORDS = NoDATA?
Maybe part of the reason is that the industry has realized that a lot of NoSQL databases just plain suck. Don’t forget that the “big” Hadoop story of 2015 is “Hadoop-on-SQL”, which would have been QUITE the juxtaposition eighteen months ago.

Still think NoSQL databases will replace relational databases? Then read this beauty and try and say that “relational databases are outdated” with a straight face.

While they found over a PETABYTE of unsecured data without too much trouble, probably the most noteworthy finding is that they found 347 different MongoDB databases called “DELETED_BECAUSE_YOU_DIDNT_PASSWORD_PROTECT_YOUR_MONGODB”.

 

 

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Big Data Blame

I thought I’d share a very interesting article on Big Data and its massively underwhelming (so far) business impact.

Might the trade mag hype machine be close to admitting that Big Data is a far more complicated beast than they have been suggesting? Surely not…

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Oracle Big Data Lite VM 4.0

Following OpenWorld, Oracle released version 4.0 of their Big Data Appliance Lite Virtual Machine for VirtualBox.

It includes OEL 6.4, RDBMS database 12.1.0.2 with Big Data SQL, Cloudera 5.1.2, NoSQL database 3.0.14 and GoldenGate 12c.

The “Getting Started” page now has all sorts of good documentation, white papers and hands-on labs you can try out.

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Microsoft’s Analytics Platform System Appliance

In the last couple of months, Microsoft have repackaged their Parallel Data Warehouse appliance and now offer their new Analytics Platform System (APS) instead.

APS is a turnkey/black box appliance which offers the PDW, a Hadoop cluster (HDInsight, an implementation of Hortonworks) and an integration feature like Oracle’s Big Data SQL – called PolyBase – to allow the PDW to use the Hadoop data. Continue reading

2014 Gartner Hype Cycle

Gartner’s 2014 Hype Cycle was released earlier this month and shows, unsurprisingly, that Big Data and Cloud Computing are some way from reaching the prized “Plateau of Productivity” rating.

Continue reading

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Oracle Big Data SQL Primer

What is Big Data SQL?
Oracle Big Data SQL runs on the Big Data Appliance and allows an Oracle database to run one SQL query to pull data from disparate sources such as Hadoop, NoSQL and relational databases.

Continue reading

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